8 Warning Signs of Depression

I struggle with MDD, which is major depressive disorder, and I like to share as much as I can for anybody out there who is struggling. With MDD, it hits in waves, and when it hits, it hits hard, so watch for these 8 warning signs of depression, especially if you’re going through depression or have been through depression before.

  1. Hopeless Outlook.  One of the ones for me is that I have a hopeless outlook.  I feel hopeless about everything in life.  Nothing in life is going to get better.  This is all not worth it.  It’s all a waste.  I literally need to give up.  I mean, it’s just completely and utterly hopeless.
  2. Loss of Interest. The next one is that I lose interest in everything around me.  There’s nothing at all that I have enjoyed before that I can enjoy.  I don’t want to do anything. I don’t find any excitement in it.  There’s no fire in my heart, so I lose all interest in everything.
  3. Disordered Sleep. I’d rather stay in bed.  I have increased sleep issues, where I’m not even sleeping normal anymore.  Usually, I love to sleep.  But I find myself just tossing and turning. I’m up at night.  Sometimes I’m sleeping too much. I start sleeping during the daytime. Your sleep patterns are whacked.
  4. Increased Anxiety. All of a sudden, I have an increase in anxiety.  I notice I get more anxious over things, like walking out that front door or having to do chores or having to do errands or having to do work. I  get very anxious and I can feel it in my stomach and it starts to control me even more, keeping me in bed, where it’s hard to make it outside.
  5. Irritability. I get very irritable. When I’m irritable, I get very angry. Quite little things that never irritated me before irritate me.  You know, my dog barking will irritate me.  There’s no reason that they should irritate me. I should be okay with because they never really irritated before, but now they do.
  6. Changes in Eating Habits. The next is that my eating habits change.  I might eat too much or too little, but I have a huge shift in my eating habits. Usually, for me, I’m not eating anymore. The amount of food that I’m taking in is decreased a tremendous amount, so my eating habits will change.
  7. Uncontrollable Emotions. I have uncontrollable emotions. My emotions hit in waves–sometimes I’m high, sometimes I’m low–and it’s like I’m literally just rolling on this roller coaster that I don’t know what’s going on. Even when you are depressed, you have like these brief little moments that you do feel good, that you do feel happy.  But for the most part, it’s that you start crying out of the blue or you start feeling very down out of the blue, or you might even smile at something out of the blue, then it goes away and you feel horrible.  It brings back that hopelessness, that irritability.
  8. Lack of Communication.  The last one is the lack of communication when I get depressed.  I don’t share.  It’s harder for me to talk to other because I feel like a burden.  I feel like I’m bringing others down. I feel like I’m letting others down, so I also now have a lack of communication. And, I don’t tell anybody what I’m going through and I try to take it on by myself, which is not the way to do it.  You’ve got to reach out for support, especially if you’re going into depression, because if you don’t, the next thing you know, you’re a prisoner in your own mind.

These are the 8 warning signs of depression that I found for me are the ones that I notice right off the bat and really quick.

So if you’re going through these, reach out, ask for therapy, ask for help. Get with your doctor, get with your family members. Start screaming for help. Depression can be fought against. It has so many different triggers and so many different things that can bring it on. That’s why it’s important not to go it alone and to get a doctor.

Remember, this is a we thing, it’s an us thing. You got this, so let’s do it together.

 

NOTE: This post isn’t meant to diagnose; it’s to bring awareness.  If you feel that you’re getting depressed, get with a doctor, therapist, or counsellor.